Monday, March 31, 2014

Amazon's Cloud Price Reduction, A Desire To Compete Hard And Move Up The Value Chain

Recently Google slashed price for their cloud offering. Amazon, as expected, also announced their 42nd price reduction on their cloud offerings since its inception. Today, Microsoft also announced price reduction for their Azure offerings.

Unlike many other people I don't necessarily see the price reduction by Amazon as waging a price war against the competition.

Infrastructure as true commodity: IaaS is a very well understood category and Amazon, as a vendor, has strong desires to move up in the value chain. This can only happen if storage and computing become true commodity and customers value vendors based on what they can do on top of this commodity storage and computing. They become means to an end and not an end itself.

Amazon is introducing many PaaS like services on top of EC2. For example, RedShift is the fastest growing service on EC2. These services create stickiness for customers to come back and try out and perhaps buy other services. These services also create a bigger demand for the underlying cloud platform. Retaining existing customers and acquiring new customers with as little barrier as possible are key components of this strategy.

Reducing hardware cost: The hardware cost associated with computing and storage have gradually gone down. Speaking purely from financial perspective existing assets depreciate before they are taken out from service. Also, new hardware is going be cheaper than the old hardware (at the original cost). If you do pass on the cost advantage to your customers it should help you reduce price and compete at the same or a little less margin. However, hardware cost is a fraction of overall operations cost. In the short term, Amazon being a growth company will actually spend a lot more on CapEx and not just OpEx to invest and secure the future.

Economies of scale: The cost to serve two computing units is not the sum of cost to serve two one computing units. There are many economies of scales in play such as increasing data-center utilization, investment in automation, and better instance management software. Confidence in predicting minimum base volume and reducing fluctuations also gives Amazon better predictability to manage elasticity. As the overall volume goes up the elasticity or the fluctuations as percentage of overall volume go down. On top of that offerings such as Reserved Instances also are a good predictor of future demand. Amazon views Reserved Instances as how banks view CDs but many customers are looking for a "re-finance" feature for these Reserved Instances when price drops. These economic and pricing implications are great to watch.

To offer competitive pricing to win against  incumbents and make it almost impossible for new entrants to compete on the same terms is absolutely important but it would be foolish to assume it is the sole intent behind the price reduction.

Photo courtesy: Flickr

5 comments:

Peter Son said...

Thanks for updating new information about clouds. As an
application developer you have shared lot of details about clouds. Also share
your updated details about cloud in this website.

Salesforce
training in Chennai

Abhishek Chhaila said...

it seems good and very helpful!!!!!!!!!!!

Peter Son said...

Thanks for updating new information about clouds. As an
application developer you have shared lot of details about clouds. Also share
your updated details about cloud in this website.

Salesforce
training in Chennai

edvald sula said...

I was wondering what really cloud is does exist a definition if somebody ask you? is this a right defination:http://poly-technology.blogspot.com/2014/01/cloud-computing.html

ema watson said...

Cloudmaven online portal is incredible in terms of unveiling a wide range of technological stuff, which are simply hard to find over the other sites. I refer this site regularly and have bookmarked to visit it on a regular basis to enhance my knowledge and skills.